Tour of Discovery 2010

On June 12, 2010 A New Tour Begins

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iH9ou2rk_Ww&feature=player_embedded

Windows Media Video


TOUR OF DISCOVERY 2010

Ride for the Republic

Bar Harbor, ME to Key West, FL

Cycling Through the Original 13 States of the Union

2,670 Miles

60 Days of Touring

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7 Responses to “Tour of Discovery 2010”

  1. hi i am kayla a kid and i saw your u-tube and asking did you make a u-tube for today?

    • Thank you Kayla. I will be uploading several U-Tube videos by the end of each week. My Internet connection on the road is limited. At the end of each week, I will take one day to rest and on that day I will upload the videos for the week.

      Regards,

      Rafael Giraldo

  2. Wow! May you be safe in your journey. I look forward to following your adventure.

    Donna

  3. This Sunday Matt.

  4. Following your trip, Rafael, and praying for your safety. We loved having you with us in Milford, NJ. I will have to send you the pictures of our immature eagle. I finally got to see it up fairly close while out on the boat. What a treat that was last week. We are currently visiting Rockport and Gloucester, MA. Can’t believe how far you have traveled. Blessings, Linda and Rob

    • Hello Linda and Rob,

      Thank you for giving me wonderful memories. I truly enjoyed your company at Chestnut Hill. A good article published in the Sun Sentinel came out of this experience. Here is the link and a copy.

      God bless

      http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/opinion/commentary/fl-rgcol-tour-of-discovery-giraldo-0720100717,0,6576233.story

      Tour of Discovery teaches an ecological lesson on the banks of the Delaware River

      This past week was rich with discoveries. Before I left Milford, N.J., I came across the story of success that has been the Delaware River. It was Rob Castagna, owner of the Chestnut Hill House, a bed and breakfast, who told me how in 1982 the river had no fish. It was dead.

      For years, all the sewer and industrial waste of many cities had been deposited in its waters. A lifeless river had become a death sentence to the wildlife of the region. Few birds inhabited the area. All the eagles and hawks had left. The toxic water had broken the food chain so necessary to sustain life. All seemed lost. Yet, when humans find the will they can always find the way. It is refreshing to discover that most of the communities surrounding the Delaware River had finally come to understand their mistakes, and then took the necessary steps to correct it.

      Many years of wise environmental policy and education have brought the river back to life. Today, it is filled with fish and the bird populations have returned. Even the eagles and hawks are back. The day before my departure, I managed to film two red tail hawks, what looked like a mother and child. As I cycled along the banks of the river heading towards Philadelphia, I saw deer, turtles, and even a beaver. The clean waters have brought countless families of humans to enjoy its shores. An endless stream of canoes, kayaks, and other boats were visible during that hot summer day.

      Thinking about this story of ecological success, while traveling along a bike path that had been constructed where the old railroad tracks use to run, I came across the realization that as a species we are truly a puzzling paradox. Why is it that we need to be shocked and shaken into utter fear before we address problems? It was only when the river was dead that change came about. It was only after this had taken place that sewer plants were constructed and toxic phosphates were removed from many of the industrial processes. It was only when the river was dead that industrial waste was no longer permitted to reach its waters.

      It makes me wonder about the environmental catastrophe happening in the Gulf of Mexico right now. Will it take the death of the Gulf, as millions of gallons of oil pour into its waters, for us to rethink, reengineer, and then change from our dependence on this toxic source of fuel?

      For the good of the generations that will follow, I certainly hope we take advantage of this crisis and make the pivotal change.

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